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THE TORTOISE PATTERN

The tortoise pattern is timeless and has been present in the world of optics since the 1920s. At that time, the material used to produce frames with this pattern came precisely from turtle shells. Years have passed, and fortunately, today we do not use materials of animal origin to manufacture this visual effect. Today, acetate is the preferred material. However, the association of colors and small nuances that mix different shades of brown contributed to the name resisting the test of time.

Regardless of the type and shape of the frame, the brands bet year after year on this pattern. The fact that the turtle pattern allows the combination of different shades of brown or gold, makes it possible for each brand to customize its frames, but also allows the combination with different skin tones and hair colors.

There are versions of the "tortoise glasses" for both male and female audiences. Some more sober and formal, others more extravagant and relaxed to use in our usual days or in festive events. If we had to define the "turtle glasses" in one word it would be, versatility.-

Interestingly, there are still artisans using the hawksbill turtle shell. More specifically a French craftsman's house, the Maison Bonnet. Although turtle fishing has been banned since 1973, the founder, Alfred Bonnet, decided before the ban on the capture of this species, to store a large amount of shells to continue manufacturing through this material after its comercial ban. Due to the rarity of the material and the fact that each pair of glasses is produced by hand, the Maison Bonnet's "turtle goggles" can cost up to 25,000 euros.

The hawksbill turtle is one of the endangered species. Kurk Sunglasses are made exclusively of polycarbonate or acetate.

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